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the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to live in the country? so what we have seen now in the global phenomena is everywhere from sweden to america and canada to i ran to singapore is people choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in human history that this is happen voluntarily on a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: well how do we know that fertility is -- that is how is it measured and are we t
children, health, danger, settling disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book read the most practical values of our daily lives and as a shameless author, it is about what i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional societies over the last 50 years. it is what other scholars have related to other societies around the world are you we are accustomed to living in big, industrial society, permanent housing with central government to make decisions. writing in books and the internet. most people live past age 60 we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you this evening. most of us eat food grown by a other people. we forget that every one of those things have evolved in human history. it is a separate biological evolution over about 6 million years. the things i just mentioned did not exist anywhere in the world 11,000 years ago. they were only within the last 11,000 years or it some of them, such as the internet and most people living past age 60, arose only within the last century or two. that is the an
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost -- certainly first several decades, people back in washington were saying, what have we done here? we've conquered this land but dough don't understand and it we can't good afternoon it. we should just give it back. give it back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence. there was slavery and there was hostage taking and -- just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. that's part two. part three is about kit carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people, and everything he did with that. monster slayer it's called, and this is from the final act of his long career, and it's probably what he is best known for, this sort of a scorched earth campaign he led into navajo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved lands, and this great experiment that went on to try to force the navajo to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living in this sort of reservation on the border with texas. so it's a b
up children, health, danger, a settlement disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book, my book of, i think, the most practical value to our daily lives, and, as a shameless author, i hope it is going to be my best-selling book. [laughter] it is about one i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies in new guinea of the last 60 years, and it is about what friends and others have learned from other trouble societies around the world. the essence of living in big, industrial societies and permanent housing with central governments to make decisions with writing and books and the internet. most people live past age 60, where we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you this evening, and we are most of us eating food -- food grown by older people. we forget that every one of those things arose very recently in human history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution for about 6 million years. all of the things that i just mentioned did not exist anywhere in
is. i went from republicans to independents, to democrat. three reasons. number one, i want religion out of the party. i have a religion. that's my business. i have a political party. that's the political parties business. number two, women's issues. i don't personally believe in abortion, but i don't believe i have the rights tell my neighbor what they should do. i think the republican party needs to get out of people's bedrooms and back into the boardrooms. number three, the middle-class tax hikes their break-in instituted. we never recovered from that. to my city unions. all things that had middle-class workers. ending tax like state sales tax, all of these things it is strictly, so i know when it happened. it was in the reagan years. >> host: thanks, caller. >> guest: >> guest: a few republican come you a liberal one. undertake the supporters. she says she wants religion out of politics. i wonder she would've felt that way about the civil rights movement because it is actually martin luther king was not only a top her. he was also the reverend dr. martin luther king. the power of
idea that the first one that was abandoned. there are a lot of religions. the left turned against religion . it will pass the movement inspiration in the dr. king magnificent formula of equal votes, 1 foot in the scripture, 1 foot in the constitution. the next thing you know, returning against the spiritual base of democracy. we must remember the civil war with the century. that was grilling of manila. my textbooks of the civil war had nothing to do with slavery. to this the their textbooks in history have referred to the political movements that overthrew the lincoln government after the civil war and restored boys of permissiveness of and pair of the way for server edition. the text which refer to the move and as the redeemer. the retainers faugh terrorism as much as the terrorism the play is a world where so attuned to when it is not. grace has the power of turning your whole sense of perception of side down. the odds of internal politics of saddam. one of the chapters, but to together by 1964. yet the democratic convention and republican convention. the republicans with a part
. religion does well. this wall behind the paperback fiction combat rolls out here on a steady basis. both for locals and visitors who want something light to read. the author breakfast meats here all winter long before the metropolitan opera, which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. there is a breakfast and a lecture here. we do a lot with music and arts. the history of santa fe is vivid with two major cultures. native american, hispanic, and the anglo. now, that is actually oversimplifying things, but each one carries such a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today. we do events here. we boast the best spanish colonial art market. we sell books at the indian market, which is the largest art market in the world. for many years we have sold looks in the spanish market. again, the largest hispanic market in the world. we are falling all over each other but the sharing and the support that is universal makes it such a wonderfully exciting place to be. >> in the very early day, sa
that was all because we had to bowed down to the religion of the free market and what can never be repaid regarding t.a.r.p. is the contradiction, the double standard that when the plutocrats got into trouble, all of that garbage about the free market milton friedman and all that stuff got thrown a right out the window and said it is the double standard. it's the hypocrisy, the contradiction that can never be repaid. thanks. >> guest: let me talk about that because the caller raises an interesting point and this is something i've put a report out this past week. one of the things we learned in 2008 is that our financial system was very vulnerable to these highly interconnected financial institutions, these too big to fail companies. not only were the highly interconnected with each other, but what they learned is that their failure actually threatened american jobs and american pensions and american mortgages and that was shocking. i don't think that the regulators were prepared to deal with that and so even with the bailout coming at preventing the failure of some of the institutions, th
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
religions, so so religion does well. this whole wall behind me is paperback fiction, and that rolls out of here on a steady basis both to locals and to visitors who want something light to read while they're traveling and nothing tooer the or my important -- too terribly important. the opera breakfast meets here all winter long before the simulcasts from the metropolitan opera which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. and there's a breakfast here and a lecture, so we do a lot with music, a lot with art and pretty much everything. the history of santa fe is rooted in three major cultures; the native american, the his hispanic and the anglo. now that's, obviously, oversimplifying things. but each one carries a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today up at the indian school. we do events for them here. we boast the best of the spanish colonial art market. we sell books up at the indian market in august which is the large native american art market in the world, and for many yea
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
else's religion or somebody else's life. it's an area that just so thed to pass -- just voted to tax themselves so we could have better health care and better schools and better transportation. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology-related issues, though, do you hear anything that your constituents -- >> guest: well, yes. there is concern about innovation and the role that current law has in the area of copyright and patent in stifling innovation. that's difficult to remedy. we had a patent bill that i actually ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for the years -- for 12 years that really didn't do what we'd hoped it would do. we've got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in term ors of technology -- terms of technology innovation. i'm sure you all remember the sopa brouhaha of last year. we stopped the overreach from the copyright max laws, but the technology companies -- i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and cr
somebody else's religion are somebody else's life. it's an area they voted to tax themselves we could have better health care and better schools. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology related issues, do you hear anything that your constituency wants? >> guest: there is concern about innovation and the role that the current law has in the area in stifling innovation. that is difficult to remedy. we had a bill that i ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for 12 years that really didn't do what we had hoped it would do. we have got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in terms of technology innovation. i am sure you all remember the sofa brouhaha last year. we stop the overreach from the copyright board that the -- i'm not talking about the company's. i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and creating things feel that there is a problem in terms of the copyright regime and we come together and make sure that it works in the int
on tolerance, justice and where no discrimination based on religion, gender or ethnicity can be accepted. so, president, i'm very pleased to see that your government is defending marriage for all. [applause] >> translator: that is also our stance on the issue. change is afoot in france, president, but also in europe. we need to continue in order to create a fairer social europe, one that shows solidarity and one which is stronger on the global stage. your role is crucial, president. do not give in to the vision of a single market that mr. cameron sees. that's not our vision of europe. quite the contrary, in fact. you need to say to mrs. merkel, mr. president: angela, eisenhower, brant, schmidt, cole, all of these men had a vision of europe. help me to achieve our vision of europe. you've said that you would recreate the french vision when you were elected, and now in the council you can help breathe life back into the european vision. thank you. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: thank you very much, indeed. now on behalf of the united liberals and -- [inaudible] displt th
, religion, etc. discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, it started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something -- i'm jumping ahead a little bit. but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country the president in the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these testimonies which were sort of created by presidents, we think, are there from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist. he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had
a consequence. we know these people are preyed upon by those who would use religion and philosophies about government to do great damage to the world. this is a tough challenge. and we talked about this issue for four hours in the foreign relations committee this morning. so i spend some time on this issue. i talk about our young people. i don't know in the 12 years i've been in the senate if i've ever turned a college or a high school or a grade school down on a speech or anything other than if i just couldn't do it or i had votes. that's our first responsibility, any of us who hold public office, is to connect with this next generation. it is to reverse the optics with them as well as reverse the optics with the rest of the world. and it doesn't matter whether americans think we're treated unfairly or not. latest gallup poll, latest poll coming out of the middle east last week -- some of you may have seen this -- more than 8 out of 10 residents of the middle east, countries, by the way, where we have strong relationships with leadership and the governments, jordan, saudi arabia, united a
for artist who are freethinkers. a lot of people practice the religion, the lifestyle, the intellectual thoughts, it has always been very interesting place for people who are really thinking for themselves. it is only natural that gorgeousness of the sce the sce, visual artists and the performing artist who managed to dance and sing at 7000 feet above sea level is amazing. but the availability of a small town makes it easy for people to become intimately acquainted with those in the art to serve on boards fairly quickly to attend event and meet artists. the cross culture of visualize performing arts and literary arts is just unnatural. thank you. we are in albuquerque, we produced this beautiful book. we had some left over. those leftovers went to the city.
the war. buckley says yale is insufficiently respectful of religion despite its religious heritage and religious heritage of most of the elite academia in america. also they don't present every enterprise side of economics. they are too changing, quasi-socialist. rusher agreed with all of that. but i think the greater affinity of buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law, brent mosel's 1984 book, mccarthy and his enemies to which they say yet, mccarthy spent a little too rough. he's made some errors in judgment. but that causes really, really important. and he's being treated unfairly. that's exactly where rusher, that's exactly where rusher is in 1954-55-56, in the years where he turns from generic young republican republicanism to hard movement conservatism. there was a bit of the conservative movement even before buckley founded "national review" in 1955, but it was sort of, it was a little -- it was disorganized. the polite term might be entrepreneurial, individualist individualistic. a whittaker chambers had another way to describe it but he said it was like people
of things that drive us apart; politics, ideology and each religion. today, though, we come together in the spirit of jesus who taught us to love one another, treat others as we want to be treated and to love god with all our heart, soul, mind and strength. it would be a whole lot better world if we just listened to him. >> as you look around the room, understand that you're sharing this meal with people from more than 160 countries, all 50 states, the president, heads of state, leaders of all kind. through prayer we believe god has brought us together for a reason. as you listen closely to the program, try to figure out what god is saying to you. and as you've heard, this event is hosted by members of the house and senate, and i'd like to ask all the members of the house and senate or who are present to stand at this time. [applause] we're also honored to be joined by two prime ministers, the prime minister of serbia, his excellency, and the prime minister of the democratic republic of congo, his excellence -- excellency. thank you so much for being with us. [applause] >> thank you.
in a city like this, there are thousands of things that drive us apart. politics, ideology and even religion. we come together in the spirit of jesus who told us to love one another and to treat others as we want to be treated and love god with all of your heart, soul, mind and strength. it would be a better world if we just listen to it. >> as you look around the world i had a stand that you are sharing this meal. all 50 states, presidents, heads of state, leaders of all kind through prayer we believe that god has brought us together for a reason. as you listen closely to the program, try to figure out what god is saying to you. as you have heard this is hosted by the members of the house and senate and i would ask all of the members of the house and senate to stand at this time. with .. [applause] thank you. thank you. and now i'd like to introduce the head table that will lead us through this experience. i'll start on my right. today you can say that you ate breakfast with the president and as a gold metalist. at the end of the program, it will be offered by olympics champion gabriel doug
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, certainly the first several decades people in washington were saying but if we done here? would conquer this land, but we didn't understand it and became governor. we should give it all back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there is just so much violence, so much slavery and hostagetaking in some unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. so that's part 2. part 3 is about carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people in everything he did with that monster slayer and this is the final act of his long career and probably woody's best known for common disorders campaign that is added to non-country that resulted in the conquest from their beloved land in this great experiment that went on to force the navajos to become farmers and christians living in the reservation and on the border with texas. so that's a big outfit has been a parts and the remarkable thing is kit carson is the through line that makes it make sense. he intersect did with all these aspects of his story out h
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
people standing up against militants and terrorists, using a religion, for instead as a mobilizing force. i think that charles is an instrument have had some efficacy in terms of precision. it's like saying, you know, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in. we use our road to an anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so you know, we don't see them as part of it at all. [inaudible] >> excuse me? [inaudible] >> you need to be a very big five on that committee will. but i think we are all in the same page now. members of the staff found where the future of this size. pakistan has to take ownership of absolutely all of them to be sustainable and be seen as legitimate in the eyes of ip hole. you know, there's been a lot of churn strikes next-door also. and in any case, you know the whole al qaeda is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts pretty much degraded. that said the administration will agree to also. >> thank you very much. you talk about the process in afghanistan being led. president karzai presents a pakistan and un
other's religion. just before the bell rang, one of the boxers made the sign of the cross. the rabbi nudged the priest and said, what does that mean? the priest said it doesn't mean a darn thing if you can't fight. [laughter] we bless ourselves with the hope that everything will be okay in this country. but very frankly, it won't mean a thing unless you're willing to fight for it. so my message to you, to the students in this audience, but it doesn't mean a thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream. the dream that my parents had. the dream of giving our children a better life. the dream of maintaining a government for the people. that torch of duty is now passing to a new generation. with that passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for that better future. thank you, very much. god bless you. and god bless the united states of america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you. [applause] okay, i will take a few questions. >> thank you, thank you secretary panetta for talking to us. i am in the security studies program here at georgetown. i am taking
using a religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. so i think drones as an instrument they have had some advocacy in terms of precision, but it's like saying we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come and for instance. to run anti-terror operations when we can come the women were able to move the protect them. so drones are now, we do see them as productive at all. >> what general staff comes to you and said we need -- [inaudible] >> excuse me? you need to be a very big fire that committee wall, wouldn't you? >> john mccain. >> career on the same page now come the members of general staff on where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there's been a lot of drones strikes next door, so in any case, you know al qaeda -- the whole al qaeda list is pretty much through our cooperation, a joint after a night spent in this administration will agree to also. >> you talk about the process in afghanistan being afghan led. president karzai had this
of their race, color, religion, or gender. vawa encourages collaboration among law enforcement, judicial personnel, public and private sector providers to victims of domestic and sexual violence. it also works to increase public awareness. madam president, one in four women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. an estimated 1.3 million women are victims of sexual assault by an intimate partner every year. there are more than 18,000 cases in maryland of domestic abuse and 38 fatalities. that period of time has been the lowest number of domestic violence-related deaths on record for the state, but these numbers are still very much unacceptable. i am disappointed last year the house refused to take up legislation that we approved. it also refused to go to conference to work out differences between the two bills. i urge my colleagues to pass the legislation that is pending here and urge my colleagues in the house to quickly take up the senate bill and enact it into law. with that, madam president, i would suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk should
for your race or your tribe or your religion or your ideology or your region, whatever, your industry, these days, policy, politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics, and especially policy, will stand for something bigger, something broader, like the public interest, like freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of independence and constitution and the pledge of allegiance. and ideally we hope in washington that that's what think tanks do, that think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interest benefits from public policy. and, obviously, there are some who do that better than others but in the platonic ideal of the think tank is one committed to the public interest and even though we may disagree about what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have an ideology, and worldview of perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm all in favor of analyzing things and seeing what works, but to d
are going to be the ones running this at the end. >> she is going to drug you what america's religion which is democracy and everyone in america loves democracy. on a grant that. i plead guilty to taking that. >> and i am right there with you but this is not about -- there is much more going on here to get anybody that knows the middle east knows that the borders were drawn around people that don't necessarily want to live together. we have seen this in israel, palestinians and jews do not want to live together. now, we could say let's have democracy and have a one state solution. joost not want a one-stop solution and palestinians do not want a one-stop solution. it's not about the democracy in palestine and israel and its about the democracy in iraq. we said was going to make democracy and cast the sunni is down. they were not. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, the government, the education system and that is what is going to have been anybody that thinks that when the takeover and syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions into the next stat
, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, or disability deserve to be safe and protected from physical violence, and that's what this reauthorization would help to do. mr. president, finally let me say that this is not and never should be a partisan issue. violence, domestic assaults do not discriminate between republicans and democrats, independents and greens, or people who are not politically active at all. this is an equal opportunity crime that harms people regardless of their political affiliation, their profession, their location, their status in life. it is an issue that deserves bipartisan support. and i hope that my colleagues on both sides of the aisle will come together and pass this important bill. i recognize that there may be some provisions of this bill which are controversial, but surely we can come together in support of the goal of this vital legislation. we can work out differences if not on the senate floor, then in conference with the house. but surely we can come together and reauthorize this law that has made such a difference to so many in our country.
together who did not usually come together. we were not bounded in a common race or religion. we are not a theocracy. we are not a minority. this nation was born with the ideals that a united people, but these ideals compel every generation to be more inclusive and welcoming. we realize this country was not a zero some political nation. in fact, the more we open up this country to inclusion, the better we are. women joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i be
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)